Read the eye of heaven ptolemy copernicus kepler masters of modern physics by Owen Gingerich Online

the-eye-of-heaven-ptolemy-copernicus-kepler-masters-of-modern-physics

"I can think of few better ways of introducing students to the history of astronomy than by using The Eye of Heaven as a text....This is science at its best....Not only does Gingerich make you think, he also forces you back in time and makes you think as astronomers did then. Students need this inspiration." David Hughes, New Scientist Astronomer and historian Owen Gingeri"I can think of few better ways of introducing students to the history of astronomy than by using The Eye of Heaven as a text....This is science at its best....Not only does Gingerich make you think, he also forces you back in time and makes you think as astronomers did then. Students need this inspiration." David Hughes, New Scientist Astronomer and historian Owen Gingerich provides a fascinating introduction to three giants of early astronomy: Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Kepler. In these collected essays, Gingerich examines the revolution in man's conception of the universe brought about by the shift from the earth-centered cosmos of Ptolemy to the sun-centered model of Copernicus....

Title : the eye of heaven ptolemy copernicus kepler masters of modern physics
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 6621959
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 456 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

the eye of heaven ptolemy copernicus kepler masters of modern physics Reviews

  • Stephen Shapiro
    2019-03-26 22:37

    A collection aimed at historians of science and astronomers. That means that the essays are far more dense than The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus, but also somewhat more rewarding. Most of what's said about Copernicus is similar, but Gingerich fleshes out the argument that Copernicus chose heliocentrism over geocentrism for aesthetic reasons rather than observational ones. The real treat of the collection is the chapters on Kepler, who Gingerich takes from being Tycho Brahe's sidekick to one of the most philosophically rigorous (and insane. Perhaps rigorously insane?) astronomers of the era.