Read the radio beasts by Ralph Milne Farley Roger Sherman Hoar Online

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When Myles Cabot invented radio matter-transmission, he used it to visit our neighboring world of Venus. There he found himself on a world of giant insects and winged men who conversed by means of natural radio. And there, on the Radio Planet, he found a bride, a kingdom, and a home.But the menace of the giant Formians, intelligent antlike beings who had once been the mastWhen Myles Cabot invented radio matter-transmission, he used it to visit our neighboring world of Venus. There he found himself on a world of giant insects and winged men who conversed by means of natural radio. And there, on the Radio Planet, he found a bride, a kingdom, and a home.But the menace of the giant Formians, intelligent antlike beings who had once been the masters of this world, was a constant threat to his new realm. The Radio Beasts is an adventure-filled and colorful science-fiction classic of the war between these monsters, the embattled humans, and the huge bee-like beings who held the balance of power....

Title : the radio beasts
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 4031571
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 191 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

the radio beasts Reviews

  • Steve Joyce
    2019-01-28 15:13

    I guess what I like about science fiction the most is the many slants and resultant sub-genres it allows. It can emphasize humor and satire, wax poetic or prophetic, address the hard or soft sciences, contain elements of horror and/or fantasy, etc. Of course, it can also be good old escapism.I hadn't read 10 or 20 pages of The Radio Beasts when I realized that it reminded me of the Martian and Venus novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs. A quick internet browse confirmed their connection. Farley's writing ability, at least based upon this sample, matches the more acclaimed author. It holds up as entertainment even almost a century later. Naturally, as should be obvious by the title, Farley tapped more into the Radio Craze of the time. (There's almost 2 pages of technical jargon lacing the 4th chapter for the fanatics.)He does seem a little cold however. HERE COME THE SPOILERS. In one of the later chapters, the Baby King Kew is found to be alive. Good News!! (sarcasm). The dead baby thought to be him is really a "borrowed orphan" who had taken his place while his little royalty is hid among the peasants.Also, the hero Myles Cabot is more than happy to execute a strategy called "ley fuego" in which prisoners are allowed to go so that they can be shot for trying to escape!!!It was all amusing, fast-paced and fraught with twists and turns...as they say on Venus, "an antennae-full!"

  • Derek
    2019-01-19 18:05

    It has more in common with L Sprague de Camp's Krishna series than Burrough's Barsoom. The adventure and setting are more grounded and less flight-of-fancy exuberant, with more thought put towards scientific justification of items and events. This justification and description sometimes goes horribly awry, as when he describes the physical principles behind ray-gun or teleportational applications of radio.The focus on technology impacts standard cliches about the sword and planet genre. It's typical for these stories to sprinkle in the vocabulary of the wondrous world--usually replacing 'sword' or 'pistol', annoyingly--but providing the alien word for 'diesel engine' is a new one.I kept wondering what this story would be like without its fantastic elements. Aside from a few particulars, at its base it is a civil war and the conflict for royal succession and does rather well in that aspect.

  • Charles
    2019-01-31 13:20

    I wanted to like this one more than I did. Certainly it is inventive, but the writing didn't thrill me.

  • Jonathan Stevens
    2019-01-23 12:03

    Farley's Venus is a pretty imaginative sword and planet venue. Very pulpy style, including a few uncanny "coincidence" plot devices.