Read the bushwhackers fighting for and against the confederate guerrillas in the american civil war by John McCorkle Lawrence Bailey Samuel Hildebrand Thomas M. Goodman John S. Mosby Frederick Mitchell Thomas Berry Jefferson Duffey Online

the-bushwhackers-fighting-for-and-against-the-confederate-guerrillas-in-the-american-civil-war

The bushwhackers of the Confederate Army were some of the most controversial troops of the American Civil War. The names John S. Mosby, William Clarke Quantrill and William “Bloody Bill” Anderson struck terror in the hearts of their northern opponents. But why were they so feared and how did they revolutionize warfare through the course of this ferocious war? This editionThe bushwhackers of the Confederate Army were some of the most controversial troops of the American Civil War. The names John S. Mosby, William Clarke Quantrill and William “Bloody Bill” Anderson struck terror in the hearts of their northern opponents. But why were they so feared and how did they revolutionize warfare through the course of this ferocious war? This edition aims to answer these questions through the use of primary source materials to get to the core of who guerilla soldiers were and why they fought in the way they did. The first book in the collection is by a soldier, John McCorkle, who fought alongside William Clarke Quantrill for three years. It provides a perfect introduction in the vicious world of the Confederate bushwhacker along the Missouri-Kansas borderland. Quantrill’s most controversial moment occurred in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1863. Rather than simply providing the reader with McCorkle’s account of this event we have decided also to include the eyewitness account of the massacre from the perspective of a citizen of Lawrence, Judge L. D. Bailey, which is the second book in the collection. Samuel Hildebrand’s personal memoir is the third book in the collection. Confederate sympathizers styled him as a Rob Roy of the south whilst Union supporters thought he was little more than a ruthless murderer. Unlike many of the other bushwhackers within this collection Hildebrand operated as more a lone-wolf striking at will deep in enemy territory. William Anderson, as his epithet “Bloody Bill” indicates, was a ruthless operator. After killing a large body of Union troops at Centralia he allowed Sergeant Thomas Goodman to live and continue with his guerilla troops for ten further days. Goodman’s account of his time in captivity provides brilliant insight into the terror that these Confederate irregular soldiers could cause. The fifth book in the collection is by one of the most famous confederate soldiers of the American Civil War, John S. Mosby. Unlike the previous guerilla fighters Mosby fought on the eastern front, largely in northern central Virginia. His partisan rangers were feared and respected by their union opponents in equal measure. What would it have been like to have had these guerillas as your opponents? Frederick Mitchell’s short account of fighting bushwhackers on the Lafourche in Louisiana captures such a moment in vivid detail. Thomas Berry fought within two of the most formidable partisan brigades that wreaked havoc through 1862 and 1863. His accounts of life under the leadership of John Hunt Morgan and Nathan Bedford Forrest provide gripping reading of the lighting raids that destroyed railroad bridges, logistical hubs and other strategic targets. The last two books in the collection provide a view into the end of the road for these Confederate guerrillas. The first, by Jefferson Duffey, discusses the last charge of John Hanson McNeill who died with his uniform still on, just like so many other partisan raiders. The last book, covering the activities of the Younger brothers, provides insight into the soldiers who survived the war but refused to put down their weapons after it had finished and shifted from bushwhackers to outlaws, continuing to use the techniques that they had perfected through the course of the war. ...

Title : the bushwhackers fighting for and against the confederate guerrillas in the american civil war
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 36548013
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 1396 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

the bushwhackers fighting for and against the confederate guerrillas in the american civil war Reviews

  • Charles Ray
    2018-12-09 05:37

    During the American Civil War, Confederate irregulars, known as Bushwhackers, operated in all theaters. Striking sometimes behind Union lines, they destroyed supplies, railroad hubs, and other strategic targets in lightning raids that struck terror into their opponents. Some, on the other hand, were little more than roving snipers or assassins, killing Union-sympathizing civilians as well as soldiers, and sometimes using the cover of the war to settle grievances.The Bushwhackers: Fighting for and Against the Confederate Guerrilla in the American Civil War is an introductory history of these controversial fighters, using primary sources on both sides to explain who they were and why they fought the way they did. Some of the accounts, such as the history of John McCorkle, a soldier who served as a scout for William Quantrill along the Missouri-Kansas border, or the final entry which gives a history of the Younger brothers, two among those who, after the war took to banditry, seem to romanticize these vicious fighters. On the other hand, accounts of some who were on the receiving end of the bushwhackers’ attentions, show that they could also be completely ruthless.Wherever your sympathies lie on the issue, this is a valuable volume to read, for it lays bare the horrors of the war of brother against brother in the words of participants like no other history book in my memory has done. Think of them as romantic behind-the-lines heroes or bloodthirsty killers, but these men were an integral part of the Civil War, and in many ways, they not only changed the nature of modern warfare, but put an indelible stamp on the American character.I received a free copy of this book. I give it four stars.