Read reflecting rogue inside the mind of a feminist by Pumla Dineo Gqola Online

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Reflecting Rogue is the much anticipated and brilliant collection of experimental autobiographical essays on power, pleasure and South African culture by Professor Pumla Dineo Gqola.In her most personal book to date, written from classic Gqola anti-racist, feminist perspectives, Reflecting Rogue delivers 20 essays of deliciously incisive brain food, all extremely accessiblReflecting Rogue is the much anticipated and brilliant collection of experimental autobiographical essays on power, pleasure and South African culture by Professor Pumla Dineo Gqola.In her most personal book to date, written from classic Gqola anti-racist, feminist perspectives, Reflecting Rogue delivers 20 essays of deliciously incisive brain food, all extremely accessible to a general critical readership, without sacrificing intellectual rigour.These include essays on ‘Disappearing Women’, where Gqola spends time exploring what it means to live in a country where women can simply disappear – from a secure Centurion estate in one case, to being a cop in another, and being taken by men who know them.‘On the beauty of feminist rage’ magically weaves together the shift in gender discourse in South Africa’s public spheres, using examples from #RUReferenceList, #RapeAtAzania and #RememberingKhwezi.Reflecting Rogue takes on both the difficulties and rewards of wilfully inhabiting our bodies in ‘Growing into my body’, while ‘Belonging to myself’ uncovers what it means to refuse the adversarial, self-harming lessons patriarchy teaches us about femininity.In ‘Mothering while feminist’ Gqola explores raising boys as a feminist – a lesson in humour, humility and patience from the inside. In ‘Becoming my mother’ the themes of fear, envy, adoration and resentment are unpacked in mother-daughter relationships. While ‘I’ve got all my sisters with me’ explores the heady heights of feminist joy, ‘A meditation on feminist friendship with gratitude’ exposes a new, and more personal side to ever-incisive Gqola....

Title : reflecting rogue inside the mind of a feminist
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 35899627
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 225 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

reflecting rogue inside the mind of a feminist Reviews

  • Malebo Sephodi
    2019-01-30 00:47

    Beautiful and gorgeous writing. Personal reflections on some of the things we think about but canot articulate.

  • Yolanda
    2019-02-16 01:46

    This book is a reminder that we born feminists. Phumla traces back her life and each decision she made along the way hard or not, she remained true to herself.. thought provoking book..

  • Karina Szczurek
    2019-01-24 00:58

    Incisive and revealing. Thought/emotion-provoking. It will stay with me for a very long time.

  • Tiah
    2019-02-05 02:41

    – I write because it is the only way to fully be me. – – The very act of rape is only conceivable as "artistic" when it is doubly mythologised: in the insistence that it be read exclusively as metaphor and in its distancing of the rapist into non-human form. – – Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela [:] "[w]hat kind of uhuru is it if the exercise of the right to stand up means that we are exposing ourselves to potential abuse?" – – To be a literary woman is to wade through the supposedly well-meaning cautionary words - be careful, do not dream too ambitiously, there are not enough readers, there isn't enough time, the work is thankless - words laced with less well-intentional doubt and sometimes sabotage. – – To be an African feminist writing, rioting woman on the continent is to be engaged in constant self-defence against erasure of an African feminist tradition, to begin anew, to be invited to refer to first / second / third waves which obscure and deny the long presences of African feminist movements and imagination. – – She cautioned against praising [her husband] for being a good father for doing what is taken for granted when mothers do it. She was not questioning how good a father he was. She was reminding all of us that we normalise good, full-time parenting by treating it as normal. –