Read Draft Board Blues by Robert Cooperman Online

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DRAFT BOARD BLUES is more than the story of a draft dodger. It’s about a war and a generation’s response to our debacle in Vietnam. As with all wars, old men declared war and then shoved young men into harm’s way. And as always, it was mostly the poor and the most desperate who fought the war. The losses were heavy on our side, but for the Vietnamese, they were staggering,DRAFT BOARD BLUES is more than the story of a draft dodger. It’s about a war and a generation’s response to our debacle in Vietnam. As with all wars, old men declared war and then shoved young men into harm’s way. And as always, it was mostly the poor and the most desperate who fought the war. The losses were heavy on our side, but for the Vietnamese, they were staggering, unthinkable. Cooperman’s narrator at first passively acquiesces to serving and probably dying in that conflagration. But when he gets a brief glimpse that there are other possibilities, he decides he’d rather die than have the army or the Viet Cong kill him. With wit, outrage, irony, and “a touch of the blues,” DRAFT BOARD BLUES chronicles that struggle. To read it is to be thrown back into a tumultuous time, a time not so different from our own....

Title : Draft Board Blues
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781942371274
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 82 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Draft Board Blues Reviews

  • FutureCycle Press
    2018-12-31 19:53

    We are the publisher, so all of our authors get five stars from us.Excerpts

  • Diane Kistner
    2019-01-12 19:56

    From the Book:SOME OF THE ABLES ON THE WALLAmong the far too many boys and menwho left their only lives in Vietnam,just the ghosts of their names returned again:like the Ables, carved into the Wall’s calmand cool-dark stone: Bobby Lee, Charles Edward,David Anthony, Frank Wayne, Jim Farrell,and more of that family: scattered shardsof the Ables, dead in a jungle hell.Not one of them able to leave the Wall,but pinned like butterflies there, for all time,their names frozen by printing, neat and smallto last long as hard stone, longer than rhyme.Small comfort to be carved in silent black,no Ables able to get their lives back.GUYS MY AGEI see them on the street in their wheelchairs,guys my age, their gray hair in ponytails,American flags taped to their rear handles.In summer their T-shirts might read,“I know I’m going to Heaven,because I served my time in Hell.”They’re the ones who went to Nam,believing the lies Johnson, then Nixon, spewedlike volcanic ash; or not having a choiceagainst the draft’s giant lava flowthat swept them away on a killing current.They came home in pieces, given wheelchairs.This guy’s chair is motorized;it looks like the latest model, almostsomething you might ride for fun.I’ve drifted into the crosswalkin my hurry to finish my morning errands,then drive home for lunch.Seeing him, I back up, so he won’thave to swerve into oncoming traffic.As he whirs past, he nods in thanksfor my courtesy. I nod back, the leastI can do for him, who every dayof his life lives the war I dodged.