Read Missions Unmasked: What I Never Knew about Missionary Life by Adam Mosley Online

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Our missionary myths are false. Tales of breathtaking adventures, harrowing expeditions, and close encounters of the bug kind - these are the stories we expect to hear from missionaries. Like a Hollywood blockbuster, we want action, tension, and a happily-ever-after ending, complete with smiling children and the sense that we've contributed to the betterment of humanity. BOur missionary myths are false. Tales of breathtaking adventures, harrowing expeditions, and close encounters of the bug kind - these are the stories we expect to hear from missionaries. Like a Hollywood blockbuster, we want action, tension, and a happily-ever-after ending, complete with smiling children and the sense that we've contributed to the betterment of humanity. But what if missionary life is not like that? Beyond the newsletter blurbs and well-crafted blog posts lies a missionary world that few outsiders ever see. MISSIONS UNMASKED peels off the facade shrouding the realities of that world. Adam Mosley offers an inside look into the life of a missionary, and an exploration of the challenges and issues facing global missionaries and those who care for them. It's time to move beyond the myth, embrace the humanity of the missionary, understand the brokenness of their situation, and tap into the restorative power of authentic relationships. To become better partners, we must begin by removing the mask and seeing clearly, perhaps for the first time, the real life of a missionary....

Title : Missions Unmasked: What I Never Knew about Missionary Life
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780692453056
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 216 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Missions Unmasked: What I Never Knew about Missionary Life Reviews

  • Nan Clarke
    2018-12-12 09:03

    Adam Mosley is a missionary currently working in Kenya. The thesis of his book is that missionaries are not the saintly heroes whom we have all come to envision, ready to hop into the pot of boiling water and be served up as lunch for the local cannibals. Rather, they are as flawed as the rest of us. They fight with their spouses and coworkers. They feel unappreciated and frustrated when their sponsoring board shows little or no interest in them or their work. Their stress levels rise as they come to realize that there will never be enough hours in the day to get the job done. And they must learn to live with the fact that to the locals they will always be outsiders. To research the book, Mosley interviewed dozens of missionaries, all of whom feel joy in their calling. Yet almost all experience the frustrations that Mosley describes. The American foreign mission movement began two hundred years ago. I have researched the subject for the past fifteen years, and I can say with certainty that the problems Mosley describes were the same then as they are now. My only quibble with the book is that it is written for a narrowly defined target audience: mission supporters. That’s fine, but I believe Mosley might reach a larger readership if he broadened his target audience to include all evangelical Christians. The book is written in an easy, almost conversational style. It fills an important niche; it is truly the first unmasking of modern missions that I have come across in all my research.