Read The Baltimore Waltz by Paula Vogel Online

the-baltimore-waltz

When Anna, an unmarried schoolteacher, is diagnosed with ATD, Acquired Toilet Disease, a fatal new malady with a high risk factor for elementary school teachers, she and her brother Carl take flight to Europe. Anna decides she wants to drown herself in the sensuality of food and sex, while Carl becomes involved in a wild Third Mannish espionage scheme to find a cure for hiWhen Anna, an unmarried schoolteacher, is diagnosed with ATD, Acquired Toilet Disease, a fatal new malady with a high risk factor for elementary school teachers, she and her brother Carl take flight to Europe. Anna decides she wants to drown herself in the sensuality of food and sex, while Carl becomes involved in a wild Third Mannish espionage scheme to find a cure for his sister on the Continent. Something is not quite right with the scenario, and the largest hint is dropped when Anna shows slides of their trip to Europe where each frame looks exactly like Baltimore. Carl's quest for a cure dead ends with a mad Viennese quack. Their European idyll is broken by Carl's death, and the tragic revelation that the entire play was Anna's valiant fantasy to keep alive her brother's spirit when she could not save his life....

Title : The Baltimore Waltz
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780822213598
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 72 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Baltimore Waltz Reviews

  • Samantha Liguori
    2019-04-22 14:54

    "The Baltimore Waltz" is a bit of an extreme play. We meet two siblings; Anna and Carl. They are both on vacation, touring Venice in order to give Anna one last chance at seeing the world. She is dying of the fatal illness ATD (Acquired Toilet Disease). Anna's way of coping with her fated ending is by sleeping around with every man she desires while on her vacation. She often leaves her brother alone to tour venues by himself with only the accompaniment of his faithful stuffed bunny. There is also the "Third Man" character who is always right behind the duo no matter where they go or if they separate. In the end Anna awakens to find that she is still in the hospital room she envisioned at the beginning of the play. She is with her brother who has now died of AIDS.The entire piece is an escape from a difficult situation in which the author had experienced. It reminds me of "The Glass Menagerie" in this aspect. Anna dreamed of something so real and true, yet none of it ever happened. She was not the invalid but rather her brother. The tables turned creating a perfect twist between fact and fiction. This is what I learned from this work. Vogel created another world with flashes into the "past" which was really the present. One can only escape from reality for so long, so Vogel brings Anna back into her true reality at the end of the play. I enjoyed observing Vogel create this paradox of an alternate reality.

  • Jil
    2019-04-09 14:57

    I liked this play because I enjoyed translating the French, German, and Spanish to myself in my head.I liked this play because I find works about AIDS fascinating, especially when they aren't obvious or sentimental.I liked this play because of the staging of the six stages of terminal illness.I did not like the baffling promiscuity of Anna -- am I supposed to take it that her brother, Carl, fucked away his last days, even though he had AIDS? Surely not. I did not like the baffling Third Man in this, who reminded me of what I thought were Humbert Humbert's hallucinations in Lolita.I almost did not like this play, I will admit, because I hold a grudge against Paula Vogel for abandoning Brown's theater department.But I loved the slideshow of Europe that was actually Baltimore and John Hopkins Hospital. I love how death is sudden for both Anna and the audience. I love how clear it is how much Paula Vogel really cared for her brother.

  • Daniel
    2019-03-27 18:07

    Gorgeous ending. Stretches of it felt a little disjointed as I neared the end, but I overall understood what everything meant. Wonderful use of props as symbols. I'm starting to notice the techniques Vogel uses in her plays to lay out themes and such. She's a master.

  • Megan
    2019-04-07 18:20

    I can't decide what I thought of this play. I'm not sure I understood everything, but I also accidentally read the ENDING on the back cover before I had finished it, so that was a bit of a problem.

  • Nan
    2019-04-24 19:54

    Vogel is a master playwright. Anna's self absorption is typical of living and healthy. She misses all clues of her brother's own mortality. There are, however, some odd bits that I don't quite get -- Anna's promiscuity and the rabbit. I would love to see this play staged.

  • Kathryn
    2019-04-22 17:59

    One of the first American plays about HIV/AIDS. Exquisitely written and a heartbreaking but beautiful read.

  • Jessica
    2019-03-26 16:54

    Funny, thought provoking, and sweet all at the same time. I read it in search of a monologue and really enjoyed Anna's character. I would love to see it preformed.

  • Neal
    2019-03-29 13:59

    Vogel's plays are wonderfully poignant. Highly recommended.

  • Grace Leneghan
    2019-04-23 18:15

    I loved the moment of realization when they are showing the slides from Europe and it really is just Baltimore and the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  • Brian
    2019-04-12 14:20

    A wonderful comic-noir about processing grief. As amazing, heartfelt, funny, and stylistically stunning as the movie it was inspired by. (The Third Man).

  • Rebecca Krebbs
    2019-04-01 19:59

    One more reason to adore Paula Vogel and her amazing, crazy work.

  • Nicole
    2019-04-21 13:15

    Interesting and clever. Contains graphic language and sex. Probably would be liked most readers, but not preferably for my own personal tastes.