Read Prude: Lessons I Learned When My Fiancé Filmed Porn by Emily Southwood Online

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In a culture obsessed with sex, the era of Dad’s Playboy is long gone. Today, endless free porn is a click away and full-frontal photos appear on sites as accessible as Twitter, yet many couples struggle with the underlying issues of pornography.Emily Southwood considered herself to be sexually liberal—until her fiancé landed a job filming porn for a network reality TV shoIn a culture obsessed with sex, the era of Dad’s Playboy is long gone. Today, endless free porn is a click away and full-frontal photos appear on sites as accessible as Twitter, yet many couples struggle with the underlying issues of pornography.Emily Southwood considered herself to be sexually liberal—until her fiancé landed a job filming porn for a network reality TV show and her whole world changed overnight. Once confident in her relationship, she suddenly felt jealous, insecure, and obsessively comparative to the porn stars her fiancé was around everyday. She was forced to confront feelings she didn’t even know she had: about the treatment of women in the porn industry, the hush-hush attitude toward women watching pornography, and the unrealistic expectations about sex that are often propagated by porn.Prude is a humorous memoir that explores why there is so little communication about porn in relationships. Southwood tells the story of her transformation from feeling sexually liberal-minded to realizing she had issues with porn and the industry her fiancé was a part of. She reveals her bizarre journey to conquer her discomfort around porn—and how she ends up finding herself (and ultimately fixing her relationship for good) along the way....

Title : Prude: Lessons I Learned When My Fiancé Filmed Porn
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781580054980
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 264 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Prude: Lessons I Learned When My Fiancé Filmed Porn Reviews

  • Orsolya
    2019-02-10 20:04

    How would you feel if your significant other got a job (albeit, a temporary one) involving filming porn stars in action? In what ways would it affect you personally and in your relationship? That is exactly what happened to Emily Southwood when her fiancé (now husband) began work on a Canadian reality show, “Webdreams”, which followed the lives of porn stars. Southwood reveals the experience (and drama) in, “Prude: Lessons I Learned When My Fiancé Filmed Porn”.One can’t deny that the subject matter of “Prude” arouses curiosity (no pun intended). Southwood aims to reveal her inner battles surrounding her fiancé’s job and with porn, in general. All while connecting the situation with life lessons, morals, and feminism. Does she succeed? One word: NO.Although Southwood’s tone is conversational, ‘hip’, and accessible; it is too much so. “Prude” doesn’t embark on a proper introduction or character growth and Southwood tries too hard to be modern and ‘cool’. Southwood is a woman in her early 30s (28-29 at the time of this escapade) trying even harder to be the young, pop-culture deep, best friend. Oftentimes, Southwood comes off as an immature and shallow partier. “Prude” is blog-writing, at best. Maybe an article in a gossip magazine, if we want to give Southwood even more credit.The biggest flaw of “Prude” is the absence of a cohesive writing style. Southwood jumps from journalistic flairs to a diary recall method to present tense actions and all the way to sounding like a fiction novel; with none of these being smooth in transition. “Prude” feels like several books in one. Plus, the final pages of each chapter attempt to summarize what Southwood learned from each experience but she seemingly didn’t learn anything because these poor examples of deep ponderings offer no insight. The reader will not recall anything that Southwood supposedly ‘learned’.Also annoying is Southwood’s surprise at the situation being encountered. She met her partner as a casual sexual hookup, watched porn together (before he was employed in the field), and lived a very sexual-based life with him after years of long-distance. In fact, Robbie (her significant other) even sold porn as a teen. So, what did she expect?! Southwood also constantly makes excuses for the ever-detached Robbie and doesn’t really include him in her emotional exploration. Bluntly, Southwood and Robbie don’t seem close at all. “Prude” becomes quite repetitious and boring following a pattern of a developed insecurity and/or problem in the relationship, the fight revolving around the said topic, and the attempt at a solution. “Prude” is simply too predictable.Although Southwood thanks her editors; they must have been sleeping on the job because “Prude” has grammar issues, spelling errors, and the constant overuse of choice words. Meaning, it appears Southwood had a list of words which she repeatedly sprinkled throughout the text or perhaps she use Microsoft Word’s thesaurus too much while typing (trust me: you will NEVER want to hear “hoofed” or “compartmentalized” again!). Plus, much of “Prude” is too limited to those readers living in Los Angeles (such as myself) with all of the name/location dropping. Readers in other locales may feel lost. In time, “Prude” improves slightly in terms of entertainment as Southwood becomes more neurotic and starts to “lose it”. However, this is muted by the annoyance of her constant solutions to problems: alcohol, parties, and even drugs. Not to mention, her childish behavior is amplified when she meets a guy who supposedly looks like a troll and so she refers to him as, “The Troll” from that point on. Southwood is on the level of a high school student trying to play house. This reflects on “Prude” making it sorority-level writing. The writing is also supplemented with random celebrity-spotting stories which have nothing to do with the plot and merely demonstrate Southwood’s tourist status even while living in LA.The conclusion of “Prude” is a bit too “happily-ever-after” and certainly anti-climatic resulting in a weak ending. The only worthwhile portion of “Prude” is the “Afterword” in which Southwood FINALLY explores what she learned from her experience. Although even this is detached and much too politically correct sounding like a college research paper.“Prude” follows a compelling concept but fails in execution with poor and shallow storytelling. The memoir is not recommended unless you are a 20-year old college kid or seeking merely something “quick to read”. Otherwise, I don’t suggest “Prude” nor would I read more from author. SKIP!

  • Jonathan
    2019-01-19 21:56

    Sometimes I want to give a book 4.5 stars. Maybe I should just give this one a 5, though I prefer to reserve 5s for works of monumental incredibleness.Emily Southwood represents her psyche under extraordinary circumstances with an honesty rarely found in autobiography. Though I am sure she glossed, altered, and edited, the essence of her jumps off the page on a regular basis.There's an advertisement in the back of this book for other publications from the same company, proclaiming the books are "for women, by women." If that's the case, the company is doing itself disservice. There was so much in this book to which I could relate. I mean, we're talking about reactions to porn here, and such things are not universal. They're not even gender-based.Why read this book? It works like osmosis. As the author goes through her dilemmas, one cannot help but put oneself in similar shoes and ask oneself what they would do. The work stimulates thought. That alone is enough to recommend a book, but luckily for this one it is also hilarious at points, titillating and arousing at others.Pick it up, take it for a ride. Pun intended.

  • Liralen
    2019-01-20 01:41

    Given the chance to retitle this, I think I'd call it Insecure—at its crux, prudishness isn't what the book is all about.Southwood and her fiancé were both fresh out of university (she for an MFA in writing, him for film school) when he was offered a job filming a reality show about porn stars. (He was the man behind the camera behind the camera, if you will.) Southwood okayed it less because she was okay with it and more because she thought she should be, but the longer the job went on, the less okay with it she was.It is...a potentially really interesting look behind the scenes, held back by two things:1) Lack of research. Oh, I'm sure she did some. But the vast majority of the book comes down to Southwood's insecurity (and other internal journeys), and the research about the porn industry is sprinkled very lightly throughout the book rather than informing a significant part of the material. That's not to say that I expected an academic treatise, but the book could have gone so much deeper (hmm how many double-entendres can I fit into a review?). I was very disappointed when, after getting upset with the fiancé for being unable to secure her an invite on set, Southwood decided not to go to the 'Exxxotica Expo': This expo, I've gathered, is like any other car or electronics convention, just with more strap-ons and naked chicks. I thought about tagging along one day, since it's a public place and all. Then I reflected on how awesome it would make me feel to see his coworkers in G-strings selling nipple clamps, and reconsidered (191). That's one of those things that really brings home how much her interest in the subject (she was talking about trying to write some articles if she could get on set) came down to insecurity rather than genuine interest. But failing that... So she didn't talk to any porn actors at the time: why not go back and interview some? Find out how much her reservations and claims are grounded in fact?2) Tone. Southwood takes a very informal, spilling-it-all-out-on-the-page sort of tone. Fine to some extent, but I really, really wanted to see both more research (see point 1) and more reflection from the author. I mean, she's in a potentially interesting position here. Several, really. For example, take the basic reason that she went along with her fiancé's job in the first place: that she thought she should be okay with it, even when she wasn't. Why not unpack that?Instead...I don't know if I should call it 'overshare'...but I don't really need to know what sex position she and her fiancé did at this or that time, or about her grooming habits (or at least: if you're going to go there—to talk about waxing because now your fiancé's seeing waxed porn actresses all the time and you feel insecure about it—I want to see that unpacked too), or how many people she's slept with. (For what it's worth, this complaint doesn't come down to prudishness.) Instead—why not delve into, for example, why Southwood is okay with stomach butterflies of attraction before she meets up with one of her exes but gets antsy about her fiancé filming in a brothel—in the same paragraph? (213) If the focus was going to stay so closely on Southwood and her relationship (and insecurity), then I wanted it to be a much closer shot.Lots of potential but too little external, too much self, too little useful self-interrogation.

  • Timothy McNeil
    2019-01-24 00:02

    First of all, I'd like to advise potential readers that almost everything of substance in the book is addressed in the Afterword (p. 234-249). Almost nothing would be lost other than a meandering, self-indulgent tale of how (comically?) stereotypically female Southwood was in her experiences in entering into an adult relationship (with the other person there) at the door of thirty years of age. Clearly, I am not Southwood's intended audience. Not just because I take notice that her fiance filmed the filming of pornography (which is more akin to being witness to the enterprise than a direct player in it, a point she often overlooks so as to sell her momentary discomfort). Her brand of feminism (wherever it falls on the continuum) strikes me as proprietary as any perceived slight it is aimed against. Not saying that it doesn't have merit, but it comes from a place and in a tone that makes me want to object to its faulty premises (when the premises are, indeed, faulty). Add in the insistent neediness, and I would have to admit that it was a struggle for me to find a way to give a damn about her as she told her own story.That may be the problem, at least from my perspective. Southwood spends most of the book analyzing her views on pornography as being ones that must be shared by the majority of women. There is a great deal of conflict as she works through this. It is understandable in that most of us, men or women, want to believe that we are either in step with or at least understand mainstream thinking. It never occurs to Southwood to address how her five speed vibrator allows her physical stimulation that sex toys for men don't match (and maybe that has some influence on male attraction to and reliance on pornography as a masturbatory aid). She doesn't make any mention, other than offhand self-deprecation, of how her views of romance are shaped by the slanted unrealities Jane Austin and low-grade RomComs (Sweet Home Alabama? Seriously?).For these reasons, the book feels both overindulgent and underwritten. But that is a male perspective on it, and from a reader that was hoping she would actually address more of what she learned about the industry than a smattering of online articles and Oprah pieces. It is in her inclusion of Sasha Grey at the end that left me scratching my head. Ms. Grey has cultivated a variety of images (hardcore go-to girl to playing pornstar in mainstream projects while, behind the scenes, lamenting how porn ruined her life), and she is mildly reviled by some in the industry. I write that being informed only be two print magazine articles I have read, so I may be wrong, but she seems like an odd duck to hold up as the poster child for the position Southwood arrives at in the end.

  • Andrea
    2019-02-11 03:05

    I saw this author hocking her book on Canadian tv and since it was about Webdreams (a Canadian reality tv show that is about Canadian porn that I have seen a few times) I was curious(and I am a sucker for autobiographies). This book is a true story told from a woman whose fiancé gets a job on Webdreams following minor wanna-be porn stars trying to make it in the industry. I want to start off by stating that I am more like a man when it comes to my views on porn. Although a feminist by nature, I feel I don't go against my feminist beliefs by admitting to liking and enjoying porn. I have found a lot of women are repulsed by it, embarrassed by it, or quite downright prudish towards it (the woman telling the story is all three but tries desperately to be ok with it) and therefore, I keep my views on porn to myself given that some women almost take offense to me liking it at times and I don't want to stir the pot so to speak. I by no means feel that everyone should like it or enjoy it, but be opened minded that there are different kinds and not all are degrading (some porn stars actually willingly do this for a living). However, my low rating for this book was this woman whined about it constantly. I get it, I may have some issues too if my boyfriend were filming hot chicks day in and day out. She just totally would not let it go and her total insecurity and constant questions about porn are something I just cannot identify with given my above views. I personally would find it interesting and would probably ask curious, not accusatory questions. She also goes on and on at length about how she prefers an au natural look to her "down there region". Not only do I not need to know that, but I am not in her camp with that either. She ultimately tells him to quit his job (when she barely has a job, this was pre bad economy, but oh my god I can't imagine doing that these days). The entire thing left me feeling icky. She sums it up saying that she is in a better place with all of that now with her husband(yup he married her) and new baby, but I can't help but fight the feeling that she is a severely insecure girl and I hope she gets over it, or surely the marriage will not last IMO. I just can't identify with that much insecurity at this point in my life, maybe at 18, but certainly not at almost 33, even if my boyfriend was doing the exact same job as hers was. I have far more important things to worry about. If you think this book will be tantalizing btw, it won't be, it is more of a whiny snoozefest. Unless you are dead curious, I advise to pass on this one.

  • Melissa
    2019-02-11 00:59

    I am not sure how I feel about this book. At first I thought that I hadn't had enough time to process it - read the last page 2 hours ago- but I think it is more than that. I think I am not sure how I feel about porn, like Emily, I have mixed feelings and mixed feelings about those feelings. When Emily's fiancé, Robbie, gets offered a job to film the filming of porn for a reality show, she wants to be cool with the idea, she doesn't want to be the one to keep Robbie from this opportunity to work right out of film school. She says "Take the job!', hoping all the while he will turn it down. He takes the job and they move to LA. Emily thinks that she is 'pretty darn sexually liberal' until she is faced with porn every day. This exposure forces her to think about pornography as business, as fantasy, as unrealistic expectation and as a topic of heated controversy.As a child of the 80's Emily grew up with porn as Playboy magazines under her brother's bed. Today kids as young as 11 watch it on their computers. The world is changing and our ideas about pornography need to change with it. October 2013

  • Krista
    2019-02-02 23:58

    Let's face it - The title is catchy and it's the sole reason I wanted to read this book. I also figured there would be some interesting "behind the scene" recollections that would be worth reading.If you are looking for a book that exposes porn industries secrets, this is not the book for you. However, Prude provides a funny account of Southwood's relationship with her fiancee during the year he filmed porn in LA, as well as showcasing her insecurities through the process and how she was able to work on those issues. I enjoyed how she used statistics about porn throughout the book as well. The woman clearly knows her stuff! Her internal dialogue and approach to relationships reminded me of myself in many ways. I love Southwood's style of writing and found myself laughing out loud quite often. Like, cracking up. I hope she writes another book soon.

  • Tracy Q.
    2019-02-08 03:01

    Interesting premise, but a chore to read and lacking in exposition.

  • M. Shaw
    2019-01-31 04:06

    Before you write a memoir, there should be a test you can take to make sure you're a good protagonist.I got into this book hoping for the fresh, yet down-to-earth perspective on the sex industry that the description on the back cover seems to hint at, and I kept myself convinced that I was just on the edge of finding it for 250 pages. Alas, what it left me with by the end of the narrative was not so much a resolution as an agreement to finally abandon the book's alleged premise.The story picks up when the author's fiance accepts a job as a cameraman for a sort of reality TV/documentary style show about the porn industry--not actually filming porn, but then "Lessons I Learned When My Fiance Filmed a Show About Porn" does not have the same punch. However, the central conflict of 'Prude' arises not from the author's ~1 year brush with porn production, but from her inability to be honest with herself (and, by extension, her fiance Robbie) about her needs and comfort level. From the beginning, she is transparently uncomfortable with Robbie taking a job where he will be present on porn sets. He offers her the opportunity to veto the job before he accepts it, but because she is so desperate to see herself as the "cool" girlfriend she is unwilling to give a hard no or even negotiate the situation, and he accepts the job with the understanding that she actively wants him to--which makes sense, because that's what she told him.What follows is a succession of several chapters that follow a similar formula: Robbie comes home from work. Emily asks him what he filmed today, even though she doesn't actually want to know. He tells her what he filmed today. She becomes desperately uncomfortable and chews him out for telling her what she asked him to tell her, without any prompting from him. There are several paragraphs describing her thoughts about the situation in retrospect. Next chapter.The formula creates a feeling, early on, that some sort of character arc is in progress, that we are working towards a synthesis. It gives hope that the highly, HIGHLY frustrating narrator we met in the introduction and the first chapter--cloyingly privileged, determined to see herself as the pinnacle of progressive, sex-positive feminism despite holding rigidly to strongly traditional ideas of gender, sexuality and relationships--is on a journey. That she is being forced into real-life confrontation with the patriarchal, hetero-normative attitudes that, until this point in her life, appear to have been challenged only on a purely theoretical, academic level. She then proceeds to spend the rest of the book avoiding it.'Prude' probably should have been written as an article, not a book, as evidenced by the fact that the vast majority of the text is filler. Descriptions of meals, outfits, driving in LA, outings with friends and family, wedding plans, and a sub-plot related to Emily's jealousy over people Robbie had one-night-stands with years ago, which is probably supposed to be emotionally intense for the reader but is mainly just embarrassing, in addition to a massive waste of time. These scenes are occasionally punctuated by further angst over Robbie's job, which is similar in tone and formula to the earlier scenes, only much more succinct and less introspective. The character arc that we're hoping for never arrives. What we get instead is an anticlimax (shut up) in which Emily finally makes the decision she should have made to begin with: asking Robbie to quit the job. It's clear that she views this as a sign of great personal growth, but for the reader the whole process is just incredibly tedious and, again, embarrassing. I was promised an edgy, honest look at sex work and its place in a modern relationship, and was delivered 250 pages of a middle class, cis/het white girl's emotional flailing about her inability to get what she wants without actually asking for it.Posting this, then reading a Jess Fink comic to cleanse my palette.

  • Claire
    2019-01-18 23:51

    This book openly discusses genuinely pornographic material, begging my judgemental side (Meyers-Briggs declares me INTJ - Introverted, Intuitive, Thinking, Judging) to cast final judgement. So this book greatly distressed me this evening when I had to determine how I actually thought about it.I reason I should like it, since pornography encourages people to make more people, which should only be a good thing, since the people of the future are those who will inherit the Earth, as my mother tells me.On the other hand, I know more people add to the problem of over-population, like Malthus detailed: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malthusi...So in a Mao-esque one-child-per-family mindset I don't think I should be gung-ho about the sexual act, as it forces more people into the world, while there aren't enough resources to fully support the exploding world population, even here, even with the government welfare for mothers I had to learn how to key into the register when I was saving to study in CHINA of anywhere, the most-densely populated place on the planet. (And my sister seems to be along the way with her significant other so I may be off the hook!)But I suspect that opinion also makes me into a person who is no fun, which is distressing. One of the title "crazy cat ladies". And there are always condoms coupled with morning-after pills, as boyfriends have reasoned me through, though the latter make me vomiting sick. (Or maybe it was trying to eat American Chinese food so soon after RL Chinese food that made me regurgitate like birds do to feed their chicks.)So, while I really, really strongly liked this book's calling reader values into question, I really, really don't like - ...but pornography isn't having sex, per se, which is my huge concern, c.p. the overpopulation prattle above. Pornography is watching attractive people orgasm, which is an entirely different, and an entirely pleasurable story, I'm thinking Tokimeki Memorial, even though that is just the title dating sim of my youth, not really pornography or orgasmic, or at least not the parts I got into, though I don't read Japanese as well as Russian or Latin, and some people may declare I don't read Russian or Latin well either. That gets into the question of interpreting written communication - doctors have hinted I may not read English well, either, though that is just a theory I strive to disprove every day with my score of books.And also, the author Emily Southwood was having issues with her significant other filming pornography, so she is in a similar mindset, while declaring I didn't like this book because it made me uncomfortable exposes a narrow mind-set, which I do not have. Therefore I'm fond of studying international cultures, and relating with people worldwide, as I don't have a narrow mind-set.OK, so I strongly liked this book for its calling personal values into question. It's just over pornography and sex, which are uncomfortable topics. I am fond of relating to people, particularly of diverse variety (to avoid the interbreeding panic which made me shirk my cousin's affections), though, so it follows that I strongly advocate this book.So Prude is not prudish by any means - au contraire! It made me question how I feel about sexuality and pornography. I'm going to be a creep in two weeks for Halloween, to show I'm not the rest of the year! (The political prisoner Ivan Denisovich Shukov, щ-854, whom I'm declaring is a Trotskyist, so of course Stalin imprisoned him, even if he did nothing wrong [n.b. the book leaves it open whether he did anything or not].)

  • Bob
    2019-01-17 03:04

    Well, I'm not sure how I should review this book. In a way, the book promises to be a heartfelt account of Emily's journey through her unusual life with her then boyfriend. On the other hand, by the middle of the book, I get tired of the same passive-aggressive complains and indecisiveness that she has explained repeatedly throughout the first few chapters: her difficulty in handling her boyfriend's pornography-related job.From a non-western born person's perspective, this book provide an interesting glimpse into how certain bit of western society handles the issue of sexuality, porn, and relationships. Yet, that very aspect of realism makes this book less entertaining that I thought it would. I was expecting something along the line of Bel Ami by Guy de Maupassant in which the author would adhere to the usual structure of tension, climax and release. All tied and packaged neatly into an enticing drama with repetitious, mundane parts lying down in a black hole of things left unsaid. And, yet, Emily stays true to her purpose of writing the book, which is to give an account of her experience. In that sense, the book is a valuable read for people who're trying to discover more about their sexuality, experience with porn, relationships and other similar subjects.

  • Suzanne Hayes
    2019-01-20 19:47

    Well written in certain aspects but overall the story lacks structure, and a discernible outcome.I was expecting a book about how the porn industry works and is viewed through the eyes of a female third party as the title suggests.Instead I was met with a romantic novel in which the protagonist aggressively and constantly throws verbally and emotionally abusive tantrums worthy of a child because she isn't communicating with her soon to be spouse.I was absolutely certain this book would end with all parties agreeing they were NOT ready to get married. Unfortunately in a not so surprising turn of events, the protagonist throws one last final tantrum and convinces her fiance to quit his job project that he has been working on for over a year in order to satisfy her own therapy worthy esteem issues.If anything, this book is a very well written example of how quickly a relationship can go down the drain when problems arise and therapy and counselling are ignored in favor of highschool drama.I sincerely hope this book was a really well crafted fiction novel, although by the bio of the author, I can't say it is so.

  • Nancy
    2019-02-11 00:47

    As memoir written by a fledgling author, the book offers some genuine (and often hilarious) insight--ripping open the privacy curtain--into the easy availability and changing social mores around porn. It's also a window into the changing way that American (and Canadian) society sees marriage, in terms of ages, previous sexual experiences, financial and career goals of young people hoping to find deep satisfaction in an ancient institution while simultaneously paying the bills, trying to live like adults and remaining hip to the prevailing culture.Southwood gets points for brutal honesty. When you write a memoir, you aren't crafting a fictional heroine--you're exposing your own quirks and frailties, as well as fissures in your relationships. She also gets points for style--the writing is mostly breezy and often self-deprecating--and for extracting real lessons and ideas around what happens when the forbidden suddenly becomes instantly available.My favorite moment in the book comes near the end, when Southwood talks about her fiance's new job, filming other, mainstream reality shows, which are nothing more than a different, socially "acceptable" flavor of porn.

  • Susan Bazzett-Griffith
    2019-01-24 22:46

    A bizarre, oddly and disturbingly educational, and somewhat heartfelt memoir about a woman who has to come to grips with why the pornography industry is so uncomfortable to many women when her fiancee takes a (much needed) job as a camera-man for a porn company. She is honest and reflective as she writes about why she is bothered, what sort of behavior this weird turn of events caused in her relationship, why she wishes she wasn't bothered and how all of these conflicting emotions and values she has in her head play out in her life. Ultimately, she is a very sympathetic narrator, and one that you wind up knowing more about than probably necessary in any sort of memoir except this exact one she wrote. A good, not great, but good book.

  • Jessica
    2019-02-02 01:55

    I'm astounded at how brave Southwood is to publish the sexual and emotional details of her relationship with her partner. I was drawn to this book because I am a member of a generation that went through adolescence while pornography was becoming increasingly available via internet, and many males in my age group have been watching porn since they were children; I do wonder about the impact this exposure has had on relationships. Southwood lays out all her insecurities and engages in lots of psychoanalysis regarding the discomfort she feels about her boyfriend's work filming porn, throwing in the occasional statistic and experiment in broadening sexual horizons. A quick and easy read, but still thought-provoking.

  • Carmen Giovanella Cruz
    2019-01-19 00:46

    If it weren't for my curious niece barging into my room every ten minutes, I would have finished this book in maybe 2 days. Prude is my first memoir read and it couldn't have been a better choice. Now I really suck at reviewing so I usually just say what I liked about the book.I LOVE how she basically says whatever the hell she wants to say. Its laid back, personal, funny and yet mad sweet. I know I'm going to be following Emily Southwood's writing. Like I said I suck at reviewing. So the final word. I like Prude. It was a nice enjoyable read. Worthy of 5 stars. Thank you Emily Southwood for writing about your journey with the porn industry!Won Prude in the Goodreads Giveaway.

  • Mary
    2019-02-14 22:11

    I received my copy in a first reads giveaway.The author's fiancé started his career by taking a job with a reality show about the porn industry, with her blessing. She writes about her experiences in dealing with it in her book. During the time he worked on the show, Emily learned a good deal about the porn industry itself, as well as some surprising things about herself, her feelings, and how she really feels about a touchy subject.I enjoyed reading this book. It is well written, and informative. However, due to the somewhat controversial subject matter, I would not recommend it to anyone who is not open minded.

  • Andrea
    2019-01-20 22:07

    **I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads**I have conflicting feelings about this book. As I have read in at least one other review, the Afterword is probably the only part of the book that has to be read as it really, truly gives a complete picture of Emily's "lessons learned". Although the book itself has some very interesting parts (i.e. the parts where Emily is being more descriptive and less self-pitying/conflicted), much of the book is about her internal struggle and her relationship with her now husband. While this is ok, the book probably could have been a lot shorter as it got a bit repetitive at times.

  • Elizabeth
    2019-02-16 20:57

    This book seemed very self-indulgent, which is tolerable in memoirs, but only if some greater insight is gained. While the author DID try to add some insights at the end of the book, it would have been more effective if they had been the fabric of the book, using her personal experiences as examples to illustrate how she had reached those insights. As it is, the book just comes across as whiney. I do think the writer has a good voice and will have a strong career; this book simply isn't one she will look back on fondly.

  • Samantha
    2019-01-26 19:47

    This was a really quick read for me. The writing style was informal and the content brutally honest. Southwood doesn't pull any punches about being a flawed person or how porn made her defensive. There are some definite flaws to the book. Some of the issues she faces repeat themselves but I found that to be more realistic that we don't always get what life is trying to tell us. This was a great read and I would recommend it especially for summer.

  • Margo
    2019-02-09 01:01

    I was surprisingly taken in by Southwood's view of herself, as well as the portrayal of her fiancé.Although I have never gone through something like this with my husband, both our loving moments and our fights were almost painfully similar to Mrs. Southwood, causing me to sit through them, wanting to knock myself over the head and end my suffering.This book made me irritated and caused me to seethe for a full day, but I ended feeling very happy about the way things turned out.

  • Autumn
    2019-02-03 03:49

    I couldn't get past the second chapter. I want to believe that Emily eventually loosened up a bit and at least became more tolerant of the culture but I couldn't tolerate her negativity and obvious contempt for the industry and those who take interest in it. Don't get me wrong, if my fiance suddenly took this sort of job, I'd be anxious as well. But there is a difference between prudishness and disdain.

  • Sarah
    2019-02-09 00:46

    I'd like to be kinder to this title, especially considering the author's ruthless honestly about some very personal subjects, but I did not enjoy this book. I wanted to, I tried to, but I found her views on just about everything, from the subject matter to relationships in general to be immature and enraging.

  • ¤Leila | The Fiction Pixie¤
    2019-02-04 01:42

    This wasn't a book that I finished. While most reviews said that her attitude improves throughout the course of the book, her demeanor and distaste for the industry and work her partner was doing was overbearing, arrogant, and evenly slightly contrite and I couldn't get past it.

  • Christine Mondy
    2019-01-22 01:55

    I loved this book. Emily Southwood's wrote things I thought in my head. I like how honest the book was. Pornography does play a part in most relationships, unfortunately, and it was refreshing to read another woman's struggle with the topic.

  • Damián
    2019-02-05 19:46

    A confident and honest peace of work. Emily Southwood stays true to her self, she doesn't try to cover the reality of her situation with pretty words, you read the story as it is, or at least, you can get that sensation, and that's what makes this book a wonderful reading.

  • Erin
    2019-02-07 02:04

    Emily Southwood's voice is refreshing, humorous and honest in this candid insight into her coping (or not so coping) with her finace's work along side the porn industry.