Read Maid In Waiting by John Galsworthy Online

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John Galsworthy (1867-1933) devoted virtually his entire professional career to creating a fictional but entirely representative family of propertied Victorians, the Forsytes. He made their lives and times, loves and losses, fortunes and deaths so real that readers accused him of including as characters in his drama real individuals whom they knew.Often incorrectly calledJohn Galsworthy (1867-1933) devoted virtually his entire professional career to creating a fictional but entirely representative family of propertied Victorians, the Forsytes. He made their lives and times, loves and losses, fortunes and deaths so real that readers accused him of including as characters in his drama real individuals whom they knew.Often incorrectly called THE FORSYTE SAGA, the nine novel sequence properly known as THE FORSYTE CHRONICLES contains three trilogies, of which the first trilogy is THE FORSYTE SAGA (THE MAN OF PROPERTY, IN CHANCERY, TO LET). The second trilogy, A MODERN COMEDY (THE WHITE MONKEY, THE SILVER SPOON, SWAN SONG) is followed by the third and concluding trilogy, END OF THE CHAPTER (MAID IN WAITING, FLOWERING WILDERNESS, ONE MORE RIVER). THE FORSYTE CHRONICLES has become established as one of the most popular and enduring works of twentieth century literature, described by the New York Times as: "A social satire of epic proportions and one that does not suffer by comparison with Thackeray's VANITY FAIR...the whole comedy of manners, convincing both in its fidelity to life and as a work of art."...

Title : Maid In Waiting
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ISBN : 9780736643825
Format Type : Audio Cassette
Number of Pages : 0 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Maid In Waiting Reviews

  • Kathryn
    2019-02-03 01:04

    This is the 7th in the Forsyte Chronicles series which I started reading with a Goodreads friend, Anita, last year. The first 6 follow the Forsyte family - who in many respects are not actually very nice people, on the whole, but it has been interesting reading. This book starts to follow a family affiliated with the Forsytes by marriage. The main female character, Dinny Charwell (it’s pronounced Cherrell), is a lovely woman - full of life and kindness. I enjoyed getting a look at the Forsytes from her point of view.There are 2 main story lines in this book, and they both had me agog to find out what was going to happen. I was a little sad to read of most of the characters’ loss of faith in a God with whom they are able to engage in a personal relationship, but I can understand, given what they had experienced with WWI - the stress and trauma and the upset it caused to people’s mental health must have been very fresh and raw. Mental health is one of the main themes for one of the story lines as well, which is interesting, given that it must have been quite a taboo subject at that time with a great stigma attached to it.I think I’ve currently overdosed on Galsworthy and need to take a little bit of a break before I get entrenched in number 8, The Flowering Wilderness. But I’m eager to see what happens with Dinny as we continue. I'm giving this one 3.5 stars.

  • Sandy (CA)
    2019-02-10 00:06

    A mediocre story from an author who was capable of much better. It was a disappointment for me to learn that book 7 in The Forsyte Chronicles was not really about the Forsyte family at all (but rather about the siblings, nieces, and nephews of Fleur Forsyte's husband's mother). To claim this book as part of the Forsyte story is a bit of a misnomer. There are shades of Fleur Forsyte in the main character, Dinny, but without the spunk. Nonetheless, the cast of characters are human and likeable and the cliffhanger in the final chapter entices the reader to seek out book 8 (which I fully intend to do).

  • Abbey
    2019-01-21 21:44

    BOTTOM LINE: #7 of 9 Forsyte Saga, interpersonal doings of a Society family; family saga, not-quite-classic. Mild and pleasant, filled with ramblings about politics-of-the-day and suchlike, usually something I enjoy, but there’s no spark - he’s done it far better before. A young woman rambles through her life, as crises arise and are worked out with the aid of her many, and varied, relatives. The lead character Dinny, while interesting and “nice”, isn’t as vivid as Fleur, or as gripping as Irene, and the plotting is far too similar to earlier happenings in this long series. This third trilogy about the Forsytes seems, to put it mildly, redundant. Pacing is abysmal, and we see very little of the Forsytes we’ve come to know, love, and hate - Soames and Jolyon are dead, Fleur and Michael are extremely peripheral. Too bad. Galsworthy must have needed the money - there’s nothing special to recommend it over thousands of other late 20s/early 30s Society-centered books. Like millions of others at the time, I suspect, I read it to find out what happened to Fleur after her father’s death, and Fleur is barely present here. What a gyp!

  • K.M. Weiland
    2019-02-13 21:04

    After the cataclysmic events at the end of the last volume, I fully expected to continue with the story of Fleur, Jon, and Michael. But here we unceremoniously switch perspectives to the little-mentioned cousins of the Monts, most notably one of the young daughters. This isn't necessarily a bad thing. I found Dinny a thoroughly likable character. The plot is a bit frenetic and episodic (and, I dare say, melodramatic), but it's also engaging and as socially insightful as ever. Although not perhaps as objectively good as some of the previous installments, I'd have to say I enjoyed as much as any in the series.

  • Sara Giacalone
    2019-01-20 00:37

    Beautifully written and thought provoking, Maid in Waiting focuses on a different branch of the family (with Fleur and Michael Mont as the only familiar characters). The same over-arching themes are here though, including love and marriage, family, duty and service - and how our perceptions of these themes change over time, as society changes.

  • Eggp
    2019-01-28 23:48

    Dinny the meddlermatchmaking, mental patientsnothing is sacred.

  • Michael Stewart
    2019-02-07 18:04

    Book 7 of the FORSYTE CHRONICLES, book 1 of the last trilogy grouped as END OF THE CHAPTER. This novel published in 1931.This is the first of the non-FORSYTE novels, as Fleur Forsyte Mont and Michael Mont are supporting, really peripheral characters. The lead character is Dinny Cherrell, a cousin to Michael.The narrative is tight even as it meanders through the vagaries of marriages proposed, marriages in jeopardy, and marriages rushed into. There is much politesse and near-silent wooing. But this is not a Nancy Mitford comedy of manners. There is real jeopardy as murder/manslaughter charges loom over Dinny's brother from his work in Bolivia.Galsworthy ruminates often on whether God exists, and if he does, why so much poverty? Are we put here to suffer? Could be. Dinny takes a humanist approach to these vexing and insoluble questions - try to do good is basically it. Galsworthy conveniently gives us a vicar to bounce philosophies off.There is also a character with possible psychosis, and characters are distressed by how to help him and address the human fallout for spouse and children. Really, HOW does one help someone suffering from illness and help the collateral victims? The questions may be eternal, but the discussion was still engaging, and the societal approach not so different almost a century later.Galsworthy was a lawyer, though he practiced little or not at all. But he brings multiple perspectives to many legalities raised in the novel. It bears noting that, as with other books from the same period, the infamous N-word is tossed about in what was then no doubt a benign fashion. But the casual use can startle. Still, this is an entertaining novel, but best enjoyed as a different branch of the Forsytes - I don't think it would be a good read without already having experienced the Forsyte milieu.

  • Anita
    2019-01-30 22:46

    3.75 stars. Maid in Waiting is the first novel in the Cherrell's/Charwell's story in The Forstye's Saga. Sadly, there are very few Forsytes included in the story, and I found they brought the drama into previous books' plots. The novel centers itself around young Hubert Cherrell's return to England after an adventure to Bolivia under American Professor Hallorsen. Hallorsen wrote of Hubert's confrontation with a Bolivian ended in murder of one of the men. It is only when Hubert's own travel journal is published in London that the truth comes out. Hallorsen abandoned his men, leaving unexperienced Hubert in charge, with few resources. Hubert acts as any former soldier would when confronted when put on the defensive, he shoots. Hubert's saving grace is truly his sister Dinny, who takes on his cause, while her family seeks into a social depression. Dinny has Hubert's journals published and even brings his writings to the attention of a member of Parliament in hopes to save her brother from a court marshal and prison sentence, which would bring shame to the Cherrell's. Dinny gathers the family, including Sir Lawrence, Uncle Adrian (an adventurer himself), and Uncle Hilary, known in the previous Forsyte novel as a benevolent rector who seeks to end London's poverty, to come to his aid. Dinny also nudges Hubert's return to society, where he meets Jean Tasberg, the neighboring rector's daughter. Jean is much like Dinny in that she is a "new woman" of the 20th century, and is feisty in her support of Hubert. Thankfully, their story ends happily with their marriage, which leads one to believe that without a woman by his side, Hubert would not have survived the scandal.

  • Ali
    2019-02-09 00:04

    Following the quite climatic ending to the previous volume, we put the Forsytes to one side and concentrate instead on the Cherrell family, cousins of the Mont’s; the family Fleur Forsyte married into. Fleur and her husband Michael having now been married for about eight years, remain just peripheral characters in this novel.Hubert Cherrell, son of Sir Conway Cherrell, on sick leave from the R.A.F, joined an expedition to Bolivia, where he got into a whole heap of trouble involving some Bolivian men who Hubert flogged for animal cruelty – one man was shot – and the expedition failed. Now Hubert has had his name linked to the failure of the expedition in the newspapers, by Hallorsen – the American who led the expedition and has had hard words to say about Hubert since. Soon it appears that Hubert may even have to face extradition to Bolivia to answer for the shooting, which Hubert claims was self-defence.

  • Victoria
    2019-01-24 00:57

    This would be more interesting if it were about the Forsytes rather than their more dutiful relatives by marriage. I'm disappointed to learn that the entire third (final) trilogy is about this family. I want to know more about Irene, Jon, June, Holly, Val Dartie, etc. How could Galsworthy leave us hanging like this?

  • Anne
    2019-02-18 16:40

    Not the best Galsworthy, but a good read

  • Dr.J.G.
    2019-02-09 20:55

    Forsyte Chronicles:-This work developed over a lifetime and began with a simple theme, that of individual's right to life and love, especially those of a woman. The first trilogy, Forsyte Saga, is the most famous of all. There are three trilogies, Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter being the second and the third. The Forsyte 'Change was written as separate stories about the various characters and spans the time from migration of Jolyon Forsyte the original, referred to usually as Superior Dosset, the paterfamilias of the Forsytes, to London from border of Devon and Dorsetshire, onwards well into the time connecting it to the beginning of the second trilogy. The first two trilogies have interconnecting interludes between each of their two parts...............................................................................................................................................The Forsyte Saga:-The Forsyte Saga was not planned as such but developed over years with sequels coming naturally as they did, and human heart and passion and minds within settings of high society of a Victorian and post Victorian England - chiefly London - and its solid base in property.When it was published it was revolutionary in the theme - a woman is not owned by her husband, and love is not a duty she owes but a bond that is very real however intangible, that cannot be faked.Wednesday, September 10, 2008........................................................................ A Modern Comedy:-The second part of Forsyte Chronicles begins - with The White Monkey, first volume of the Modern Comedy - where the Forsyte Saga left off, with a six years gap that includes what was then called the great war and is now known as the first world war. The story here continues with Fleur at the centre and her father, Soames, close to her, with Jon and his mother Irene far away in US. ..............................................................................................................................................End of the Chapter:-In the third trilogy of Forsyte chronicles the story centres on cousins of Michael Mont, mainly on his mother's side, the Charwells who are socially somewhere bordering on landed gentry and aristocracy, unlike Forsytes who made their way up from farmer to various money making professions (solicitor, investment manager, builders, stockbrokers and more) to artists and gentry of leisure. Being upper caste in England amounts to being bred and brought up to notions of service to the country and accordingly the Charwells are occupied with work dealing with law, church, and so on, when not with actual landownership including caring for the tenants and other residents of the land. Mostly the three parts focus on Dinny, Elizabeth Charwell, an attractive young woman of Botticelli beauty with a sensitive heart and capable mind who cares for not only her own family and clan but anyone around who might need her, and does the care taking actively with initiatives, meeting people and speaking to them, and more........................................................................Maid In Waiting :-In Maid in Waiting, Dinny who is the person the title is after, is busy rescuing her brother and an uncle and other related people from various tangles to do with love, empire, standards of behaviour to do with scientific expeditions and treatment of people and animals, love, mental illness and more. She is unable to consider a brighter prospect for herself with either of the two very suitable beaux who fall in love with her, and would not make a match yet........................................................................

  • John
    2019-02-04 17:59

    This first volume of Galsworthy's End of the Chapter provides a different atmosphere than his Forsyte Saga and The Modern Comedy, particularly due to the change in characters and the absence of Soames in this final trilogy. Rather, the books emphasize a new character who enters into the scene named Elizabeth (Dinny) Cherrell, a likable young maiden who involves herself in saving both her brother from an unfortunate misfortune, and a friend from an unstable husband. The first circumstance taught me that the world has not changed much since the thirties, when British politicians were trying to appear respectful with other countries at the expense of their own citizens. The second situation was actually a lesson in mental illness, and the perceptions of those so afflicted at that time. In addition, some of the scenes, due to the husband's psychosis, provide some of the most tense moments of any of the previous books in the Forsyte Chronicles. Overall, I felt that the novel was excellent, and, even though, this final trilogy was written not long before Galsworthy's passing, the quality and thoughtfulness of his books did not diminish. It was a demonstration that his genius lasted until the end.

  • Mike Jensen
    2019-01-19 19:48

    Galsworthy's great theme was the redemption of troubled people. Jolian Forsythe is redeemed after following his heart and alienating his family. Soams Forsythe is redeemed after years of trying to own others, culminating in the inexcusable rape of his wife. Fleur Forsythe is redeemed from a selfish life. All are either in conflict with or, with Soams, the paragon of traditional English values, which are the bedrocks of their problems. These characters and their redemptions are built up over many years and many books about them. In this, the first book of his final trilogy, Galsworthy seems to have lost his verve. He turns to some Forsythe cousins, the Cherrells, but they are pretty much new to us. We have no investment in them or their problems, the story seems quite slight, and Galsworthy's writing style was never a reason to read these books. This is a disappointment in every way. Dinny Cherrell decides to redeem her brother's reputation and finds love along the way, though she does not want the love of either of the men who offer it. This is Dinny stuck in traditional values. Got it. I found the rendering of that theme dull in this book. Galsworthy should have quit when he was ahead.

  • Alan Swift
    2019-01-27 20:43

    I don't think this 7th part of the saga stands comparison with the earlier parts which focus on the Forsyte family. However, it is offers lots of insight into Britain in the 1930s. Society continues to change and Britain's place in the world is examined in relation to Hubert's Bolivian incident. The Charwell family note that upper class influence can be counterproductive as the reality of politics shifts ground. Danny (Elizabeth) is the central character whom I feel is certain to be the mainstay of the remaining novels with her somewhat melodramatic response to her to suitors!

  • Steven Rainer
    2019-01-23 18:52

    3.6

  • Kerry
    2019-02-10 22:42

    Excellent reading, although a few mispronunciations.

  • Dr.J.G.
    2019-02-10 17:46

    Forsyte Chronicles:-This work developed over a lifetime and began with a simple theme, that of individual's right to life and love, especially those of a woman. The first trilogy, Forsyte Saga, is the most famous of all. There are three trilogies, Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter being the second and the third. The Forsyte 'Change was written as separate stories about the various characters and spans the time from migration of Jolyon Forsyte the original, referred to usually as Superior Dosset, the paterfamilias of the Forsytes, to London from border of Devon and Dorsetshire, onwards well into the time connecting it to the beginning of the second trilogy. The first two trilogies have interconnecting interludes between each of their two parts...............................................................................................................................................The Forsyte Saga:-The Forsyte Saga was not planned as such but developed over years with sequels coming naturally as they did, and human heart and passion and minds within settings of high society of a Victorian and post Victorian England - chiefly London - and its solid base in property.When it was published it was revolutionary in the theme - a woman is not owned by her husband, and love is not a duty she owes but a bond that is very real however intangible, that cannot be faked.Wednesday, September 10, 2008........................................................................A Modern Comedy:-The second part of Forsyte Chronicles begins - with The White Monkey, first volume of the Modern Comedy - where the Forsyte Saga left off, with a six years gap that includes what was then called the great war and is now known as the first world war. The story here continues with Fleur at the centre and her father, Soames, close to her, with Jon and his mother Irene far away in US........................................................................ End of the Chapter:-In the third trilogy of Forsyte chronicles the story centres on cousins of Michael Mont, mainly on his mother's side, the Charwells who are socially somewhere bordering on landed gentry and aristocracy, unlike Forsytes who made their way up from farmer to various money making professions (solicitor, investment manager, builders, stockbrokers and more) to artists and gentry of leisure. Being upper caste in England amounts to being bred and brought up to notions of service to the country and accordingly the Charwells are occupied with work dealing with law, church, and so on, when not with actual landownership including caring for the tenants and other residents of the land. Mostly the three parts focus on Dinny, Elizabeth Charwell, an attractive young woman of Botticelli beauty with a sensitive heart and capable mind who cares for not only her own family and clan but anyone around who might need her, and does the care taking actively with initiatives, meeting people and speaking to them, and more........................................................................Maid In Waiting :-In Maid in Waiting, Dinny who is the person the title is after, is busy rescuing her brother and an uncle and other related people from various tangles to do with love, empire, standards of behaviour to do with scientific expeditions and treatment of people and animals, love, mental illness and more. She is unable to consider a brighter prospect for herself with either of the two very suitable beaux who fall in love with her, and would not make a match yet. Wednesday, September 18, 2013. ...........................................................One of the major beautiful things about Forsyte Chronicles - all three trilogies, but the first and third in particular - is the love of the author for beauty of England in general and countryside, nature in particular. Very lyrical. The other, more subtle, is the depiction of society in general, upper middle class of English society in particular and the times they lived in in the background, empire on distant horizon until the third trilogy where it is still in background but a bit less distant.The society changes from the first to the third trilogy but not radically, and in this the author is successful in portrayal of how things might seem radically different superficially but are closer to where progress began, and progress being slow in steps that various people pay heftily during their lives for.Wednesday, August 28, 2013.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

  • Robert
    2019-01-27 18:51

    As several have noted, this novel, the first in the third trilogy, shifts the focus from the Forsytes to a Fleur's husband's mother's family (yes, it is a bit complicated) and, in particular, Fleur's cousin by marriage, Dinny. It doesn't have the vivacity and force of some of the earlier novels, but it is a good read nonetheless. It is more deliberate and far more about the social changes of the 20's and, thus, more of a social comedy and less of a family drama. As social comedy, it is rich, with many different types and views of how the world is changing. Today, there is a rich sense of "If Galsworthy only knew" how much more quickly things would change. All in all, I enjoyed listening to this episode of the Chronicles and look forward to the last two books.

  • Hilary Hicklin
    2019-01-29 16:41

    I could hardly believe this was written by John Galsworthy, so different was it from the previous books in the Forsyte Chronicles. Soames is dead, Fleur and Michael are entirely peripheral - almost mentioned in passing - and this book strays from the central characters. The plot seems to be a poor imitation of a John Buchan with an extended chase sequence. At the same time Galsworthy indulges in occasional rambling thoughts about the problems facing society which are completely tangential to the plot. What a disappointment. Skip this one if you are reading the series.

  • Carol
    2019-02-09 23:07

    This is book 7 of the full 9 volume Forsyte Saga. It initially sounded like a madly convoluted bunch of plot lines, filled with people who use "should" as "would" rather than "ought", e.g., "I should very much like to go." And yet, somehow Galsworthy made these upper-class Brits likeable, understandable, and sympathetic. The focus on these final three books of the Saga focus more on the Mon branch (Fleur's husband, Michael and his many and varied kin).

  • Deb
    2019-01-23 20:40

    I'd read the first six books of the Forsyte Chronicles back in the '70s and once or twice since, but never could get into the last trilogy. (I own the boxed set of the first 6 which was the tie-in edition for the Eric Porter/Susan Hampshire TV series.) Thanks to the magic of Kindle reading I am now well launched into the last trilogy and finding it good.

  • Simon
    2019-02-11 18:54

    The focus changes onto The Cherrells, and the style changes. But the quality remains. I've only two of these books to go. So glad I'm sharing them with a wife who was more versed in literature than I was when we met. She's pointed out some treasures in our time together, but Galsworthy is probably the most unexpected delight.

  • Rita
    2019-02-13 16:56

    I'm totally addicted to the Forsyte Saga. In this book the story moves away from the Forsytes to the family that Fleur married into - the Monts & their cousins the Cherrells. Really enjoyed this book.

  • Victoria
    2019-01-20 19:00

    Loved it! I have such a deep and abiding love for Galsworthy. This book had everything you could want, family, romance, intrigue,courtroom suspense, cross-country chases. I enjoyed it so much. I hope one day to read the entire Galsworthy library.

  • Laurel Hicks
    2019-02-13 00:45

    There's a modern feel to this first book in Galsworthy's third Forsyte trilogy. We find love, of course, and also a murder trial, plans for a kidnap, a car/train chase, and here's a twist--a mad man in the attic. Very enjoyable reading.

  • Camille
    2019-02-12 18:05

    New characters who are interesting and have differing views than those of the previous 6 books in the chronicles. Strong women characters. A refreshing change of pace.

  • Nancy
    2019-02-10 20:45

    read