Read by right of sword by Arthur W. Marchmont Online

by-right-of-sword

"MY DEAR RUPERT. "Don't worry your head about me. I shall be all right. I did not see you before leaving because of the scene with your sister and Cargill, which they may perhaps tell you about. I have done with England: and as the auspices are all for war, I mean to have a shy in. I went to Vienna, thinking to offer myself to the Turks: but my sixteen years in Russia have"MY DEAR RUPERT. "Don't worry your head about me. I shall be all right. I did not see you before leaving because of the scene with your sister and Cargill, which they may perhaps tell you about. I have done with England: and as the auspices are all for war, I mean to have a shy in. I went to Vienna, thinking to offer myself to the Turks: but my sixteen years in Russia have made too much of a Russ of me to let me tolerate those lazy cruel beggars. So I turned this way. I'm going on to St Petersburg to-day, for I find all the people I knew here as a lad have gone north. I have made such a mess of things that I shall never set foot in England again. If Russia will have me, I shall volunteer, and I hope with all my soul that a Turkish bullet will find its billet in my body. It shan't be my fault if it doesn't. If I hadn't been afraid of being thought afraid, I'd have taken a shorter way half a score of times. My life is an inexpressible burden, and I only wish to God someone would think it worth while to take it. I don't want to be hard on your sister, but whatever was left in my heart or life, she has emptied, and I only wish she'd ended it at the same time. You'll know I'm pretty bad when not even the thought of our old friendship gives me a moment's pleasure. Good-bye. Don't come out after me. You won't find me if you do....

Title : by right of sword
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 13448762
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 103 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

by right of sword Reviews

  • Perry Whitford
    2019-05-02 04:02

    By rights the author should have swallowed his sword.I wouldn't really recommend a punishment of sword-swallowing. When I say sword, I of course mean pen. When I say swallow I mean snap. And when I say author I mean gormless hack who shouldn't have been entrusted to crayon his own name on slate, let alone publish a novel.An Englishman leaves his home country in disgrace to commit suicide in Russia. It's as good a place as any. Then a chance encounter gives him a better idea - why not have a little lark by pretending to be someone else?Not an easy task, one would assume. Especially if you are English and he is Russian, a cowardly Nihilist at that. Fortunately our intrepid hero puts his colossal brain to work for a few seconds and comes up with 'a good idea.'Just have a shave, act eccentric, and tell the guy's friends you had an accident, they will naturally assume that the tumble 'had effected as complete a change in my nature as in my appearance: as if my brain had been in some way affected.' Furthermore, they will each in turn endeavour to tell you all you need to know about your new self, completely ignoring the fact that you look and act differently. Besides, they prefer the new you.And why wouldn't they? Hamylton Tregethner (yes, his name was probably reason enough to assume someone else's identity) is a master swordsman, a champion boxer, wrestler, runner etc., and the chicks keep throwing themselves at him. How could such a man have been so depressed in the first place?Well, he left England because he had been jilted, so naturally he took his unfaithful-ex hostage at gunpoint. He tells us this quite casually, with not the least indication that he was wrong to do so. He even tells this to the new love of his life, the sister of the man he impersonates. She doesn't see anything wrong in it either.Mind you, before she coaxed him into becoming her brother she failed to mention that this would place him right in the middle of a Nihilist plot, not just a run-of-the-mill one either but one conceived with 'a little double cunning.' Arthur W. Marchmont obviously came from that same low-grade league of inept Edwardian adventure writers as the likes of Fergus Hume and Crittenden Marriott. Hapless one and all, but good for the occasional inadvertent laugh.The best unintentional titter on offer here was this gem of an observation, made by the hero from a particularly tight spot: 'I felt like Tantalus, when I thought of it.'Best not bother to think at all then.

  • Michael
    2019-04-22 06:59

    a good read from an author i had never heard of before.in fact very good.